Wadwell Initiatives

Why I stopped working in the cultural and creative industries.

It’s been twelve months since I gave in my resignation at my part time role in the arts. It was a great opportunity at the time, however it robbed me of my ability to enjoy the arts as a consumer. I spent my days helping others connect with artworks I was trained to love. I side-stepped in to the social sector in pursuit of a purpose-aligned role and to focus more energy on my side hustle. A lot can change in twelve months.

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Review: The Price of Profit

The Price of Profit by Jason Wicks is an essential read not just for corporates, but any business (be that for profit or not-for-profit). As the title suggests, Wicks pushes readers to consider the impact business operations have on the wider community. He provides an accessible introduction to the ideas that are going to separate businesses from being good and great in the future economy.  Read More

How many times do you have to do something for it to be considered a tradition? Last year I shared a list of TED Talks that I thought were ideas that should continue to be spread. This year I thought I would share TED Talks that helped me to live out my mantra.

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Stay in your own pocket.
Don’t make eye contact (damn it, I made eye contact.)
Are you attempting to start a conversation with your fellow commuter? Eugh.  Let me keep reading

Ideas to keep considering (or more than infotainment)

Do you remember the first TED Talk you ever watched?  Do you still marinate the ideas that were proposed? Do you follow the speaker’s work? Is any of this necessary?  Don’t stop there!

Does it pay to be a conscious consumer?

barbara-kruger-untitled-i-shop-therefore-i-am

Untitled (I shop therefore I am), Barbara Kruger

Change is a marathon not a sprint.

Now imagine me sitting on my bedroom floor reminding myself of this occaisionly as I wrap appreciation gifts. It has been a big year. I want to make sure that those who have been alongside the journey know how much I appreciate their support. This festive season instead of DIY gifts I decided to source ethical gifts, where my purchase saw proceeds being donated to various causes and projects around the world. I enjoy hand making gifts, but I have forgotten what I have made for whom in past years (sound off: who has the hand painted tea pots versus water jugs? Handmade necklaces versus bangles?) Don’t Stop There!

A drop in the ocean is a change in the sea levels

I used to love films about natural disasters – Volcano, Twister, Dante’s Peak – natural phenomena that I have never experienced, but I have seen the films more times than I can count. The reality is hundred of thousands of people across the world live in natural disaster-prone areas. Even more pressing is that hundreds of thousands more haven’t survived them.

How do we make the most pressing issues of our time digestible for all citizens?  Don’t stop there!

A force has been unleashed on Western Sydney. This force comes in the form of seventeen young people who are united by their determination to leave the world in a better place than when they entered it. What I love dearly about this group is their willingness to learn and to grow into the best versions of themselves for their community. Seventeen young people backed by the School for Social Entrepreneurs. Imagine the countless others across Western Sydney who do amazing things everyday that could benefit from an opportunity like this. Don’t stop there

IN FOCUS: Analise acts for Autism Awareness Month

Did you know there are 70 million people around the world with autism and 85% of them reside in developing countries [1]?

Based in New York, the Global Autism Project (GAP) is a community-capacity building program. Through hands on training and workshops, trained professionals empower disadvantaged communities to better support the growth and development of individuals with autism. Don’t Stop There!

Nothing left to do but run

I never thought I would run out of an exhibition opening. As the artist shared her anxiety about turning thirty, a fear of inadequacy and different mindsets to deal with impending death, the validating laughter from the audience caused my chest to tighten. I could feel the displeasure on my face and taste the salty tear that stained my cheek. Don’t stop there!

Interns may get a leg up, but what leg do they get to stand on?

On Saturday 13th February, Interns Australia facilitated Panel on Unpaid Internships: Experience or Exploitation? Panelists included Clara Jordan-Baird, Adam Troyn, Katelin McInerney, Linda Scott, Tilly South and Nicole Cini. Overall the session was useful to understand how the law perceives internships and what future action should (read needs to) be taken to avoid further exploitation of students. Internship culture has been on the rise. With less opportunities for employment due to what Adam Troyn referred to as the ‘over saturated graduate market,’ the idea of getting experience in order to get experience to get experience to be work ready has led to unfair conditions for students and graduates. Don’t stop there!